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Frozen Dessert Industry & Machine Articles — Scoop School

Scoop School: Flavored Waffle Cones

Posted by Destini Miller on

 Scoop School shares the details on how to flavor and color your original waffle cones. This visually appeasing sight can drive in business from all over. Not only do flavored ice cream waffle cones smell sweet, they look great and taste AMAZING. Using only (1 oz) of waffle cone extract, you can turn your regular batter into a rainbow of options! Scoop School uses extract to make vibrant red velvet cones, sweet blueberry cones, tasty strawberry cones, and many more!  By offering multiple cone flavors you can give your customers a rare item in the ice cream universe. These cones pair well...

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Scoop School: Making Waffle BOWLS

Posted by Destini Miller on

In this segment of Scoop School, Mr. C gives us the rundown on how to make our own waffle bowls for ice cream. You'll want to start with about a quarter-cup of batter and pour it directly in the center of your waffle maker. After a couple seconds scrape the batter from the waffle-iron and onto the base of your waffle cone molder. Using the accessory tool or handle, gently press the center of the waffle until a nice bowl shape is formed. Once you press on the center of the cone you stretch the bowl out a bit and...

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Scoop School: Storing Waffle Cones

Posted by Destini Miller on

 Scoop School gives us the rundown on how to store our waffle cones without sacrificing quality.  The more expensive option is the plastic display tables that can sit on the counter in front of your customers. This sight is visually appealing and helps advertise your waffle cones. Another helpful way is to wrap the individual cones in plastic and place them in a plastic container with a lid. As long as the cones are kept in an airtight container they'll remain fresh for about five days. It's important to know how to store waffle cones because they'll start to sweat...

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Scoop School: Sugar in the Mix

Posted by Destini Miller on

The custard, ice cream, Gelato, and/or frozen yogurt mix you receive from the manufacturer has likely undergone some sort of process of being sweetened already. It's important to understand sugar does not freeze so be careful when adding more sugar to your recipes. What happens if you add too much sugar to your ice cream? Well, a standard base of custard has about 14% sugar. The substance is almost that of sweetened milk before mixing. Once you add in juices, purees, flavors, extracts, (and probably more sugar), you create a very sweet product that can very easily be over-sugared. You'll...

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Scoop School: Just the Right Serving Size

Posted by Destini Miller on

In this segment of Scoop School, Mr. C talks about the different portion scoop sizes of ice cream for your business. This can vary based on how much ice cream you would like to serve in each cup, but can also make your business stand out if you serve a little more than expected.  The traditional mini size, or "kid's cup", starts at about 3oz of ice cream.  The traditional regular size, or "small", starts at about 5oz of ice cream. The traditional medium starts at about 7oz of ice cream. & The traditional large starts at about 9oz of...

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